Reading has been slow going. Presbyopia is now in full flower, and I haven’t picked up a set of reading glasses yet. (Soon, though.)

  1. The Freeze-Frame Revolution by Peter Watts. Novella set in the same universe as “The Island,” “Giants” and “Hotshot.” Review forthcoming.
  2. The Fellowship of the Ring by J. R. R. Tolkien. Reread (of course), because it had been a few years since the last time and I needed a comfort read.
  3. The Two Towers by J. R. R. Tolkien. Reread.
  4. The Return of the King by J. R. R. Tolkien. Reread.
  5. Amberlough by Lara Elena Donnelly. Secondary-world queer fantasy set in an stand-in for interwar Europe during the rise of fascism, full of secret agents, intrigue, and nightclubs. If Cabaret had been a fantasy novel. Disturbingly easy for the reader not to see the oncoming danger as danger, which is the whole point. Not as much my cuppa as you might expect, for stylistic reasons: I keep bouncing off historical fantasy (and this is close enough) with modern prose style.
  6. How to Lie with Maps, 3rd edition by Mark Monmonier. Reviewed at The Map Room.
  7. The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien edited by Humphrey Carpenter. What few secrets about Middle-earth revealed in this book are wrapped in layers of paleoconservatism, long lectures about Christianity and marriage to his sons, complaints about deadlines and schedules and available time, health issues, ferocious pedantry and general fussbudgetry. One should not know too much about one’s literary heroes.
  8. The Quest of the Missing Map by Carolyn Keene (Mildred Wirt). Nancy Drew novel, read for a forthcoming essay on maps in mystery novels.
  9. You Belong to Me by Colin Harrison. Crime thriller (more about it here), read for a forthcoming essay on maps in mystery novels.