Jonathan Crowe

Book reviewer, cat photographer, fanzine editor, map blogger, snake whisperer.

Tag: year in review

Books Read in 2017

I finished 60 books in 2017:

  1. The Obelisk Gate by N. K. Jemisin
  2. Miniatures by John Scalzi
  3. A Paradise Built in Hell by Rebecca Solnit
  4. The Stars Are Legion by Kameron Hurley
  5. Weird Dinosaurs by John Pickrell
  6. The Fifty Year Mission: The Complete, Uncensored, Unauthorized Oral History of Star Trek: The First 25 Years edited by Edward Gross and Mark A. Altman
  7. The Fifty-Year Mission: The Complete, Uncensored, and Unauthorized Oral History of Star Trek: The Next 25 Years: From The Next Generation to J. J. Abrams edited by Mark A. Altman and Edward Gross
  8. The Tropic of Serpents by Marie Brennan
  9. The Jewel and Her Lapidary by Fran Wilde
  10. A Perfect Machine by Brett Savory
  11. The Dream-Quest of Vellitt Boe by Kij Johnson
  12. Mozart in the Jungle: Sex, Drugs, and Classical Music by Blair Tindall
  13. Dune by Frank Herbert (reread)
  14. The View from the Cheap Seats by Neil Gaiman
  15. All Our Wrong Todays by Elan Mastai
  16. Borderline by Mishell Baker
  17. The Unbroken Machine: Canada’s Democracy in Action by Dale Smith
  18. Too Like the Lightning by Ada Palmer (reread)
  19. Seven Surrenders by Ada Palmer
  20. The House of Binding Thorns by Aliette de Bodard
  21. The Gradual by Christopher Priest
  22. The Collapsing Empire by John Scalzi
  23. Sleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel
  24. Waking Gods by Sylvain Neuvel
  25. Snakes of the United States and Canada by Whit Gibbons
  26. The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers
  27. Traveler of Worlds: Conversations with Robert Silverberg by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro
  28. Amatka by Karin Tidbeck
  29. The Geek Feminist Revolution by Kameron Hurley
  30. Words Are My Matter by Ursula K. Le Guin
  31. Ninefox Gambit by Yoon Ha Lee
  32. Every Heart a Doorway by Seanan McGuire
  33. The Ballad of Black Tom by Victor LaValle
  34. Penric’s Demon by Lois McMaster Bujold
  35. Penric and the Shaman by Lois McMaster Bujold
  36. The Man with the Aura by R. A. Lafferty
  37. The Nightmare Stacks by Charles Stross
  38. The Delirium Brief by Charles Stross
  39. Venera Dreams by Claude Lalumière
  40. Under the Banner of Heaven: A Story of Violent Faith by Jon Krakauer
  41. River of Teeth by Sarah Gailey
  42. Recipearium by Costi Gurgu
  43. The Stone Sky by N. K. Jemisin
  44. Infinity Wars edited by Jonathan Strahan
  45. A History of Canada in Ten Maps by Adam Shoalts
  46. How to Draw Fantasy and RPG Maps by Jared Blando
  47. The Map Thief by Heather Terrell
  48. Lethal Legacy by Linda Fairstein
  49. The Dispatcher by John Scalzi
  50. You Are Here: NYC: Mapping the Soul of the City by Katharine Harmon
  51. Vacationland by John Hodgman
  52. Down Among the Sticks and Bones by Seanan McGuire
  53. Artemis by Andy Weir
  54. Picturing America: The Golden Age of Pictorial Maps by Stephen J. Hornsby
  55. The Red Atlas: How the Soviet Union Secretly Mapped the World by John Davies and Alexander J. Kent
  56. Provenance by Ann Leckie
  57. Dragon Teeth by Michael Crichton
  58. Autonomous by Annalee Newitz
  59. All Those Explosions Were Someone Else’s Fault by James Alan Gardner
  60. The Will to Battle by Ada Palmer

Links are to my reviews. (Note that several books read in 2017 will be reviewed in 2018.)

A Year of Misguided Opinions: 2017 in Essays

My most popular opinion piece in 2017 was actually something I wrote in late 2016: “Opposition in the Age of Gish Gallops,” in which I argued that the Age of Trump required focused and strategic action from his opponents. A year later, much of what I feared has come to pass: I see a lot of blanket opposition to everything at once and not much focus, while Republican unity seems stronger than I’d hoped.

Over on The Map Room, I tackled a different kind of controversy: the Peters projection. I argued that the debate over the Peters projection was increasingly irrelevant, because wall maps were increasingly irrelevant; the future is online, and the Internet, for better or worse, uses Web Mercator. I also wrote a major piece on fantasy maps, my first in four years: “The Territory Is Not the Map” was partially a book review and partially an observation that when we talk about fantasy maps—when we talk about good maps and bad maps, for example—we’re talking about the geography of imaginary places, not the maps of those places.

In “Are Conventions Necessary?” I took a hard look at the usefulness of science fiction conventions; the piece got a lot of attention, some of it even from people who took the time to read it. (A lot of Twitter critics apparently did not.) It got an order of magnitude more page views than any of my reviews of science fiction or fantasy novels, which says something; meanwhile, my Star Wars essays (“The Lightsaber Black Market,” “The Rebel Alliance Has Terrible OpSec”), while fun to write, sank without a trace.

Speaking of book reviews, I posted nineteen of them this year: fourteen here, five at The Map Room. See this page for links. (I didn’t publish any reviews on AE this year, simply because AE didn’t publish anything at all this year. As far as I know their relaunch is still in the works, and if all goes well I’ll have reviews there in the new year.)

Finally, I wrote two essays of local interest that were widely shared by my neighbours. “J’y suis, j’y reste” was posted on the day we took possession of our house, and traced the path we took en route to becoming permanently ensconced here in Shawville. “The Latecomers” looked at the curious fact that three of the five candidates for warden were recent arrivals—including the winner (and now the Pontiac MRC warden) Jane Toller, who as Jane Pitfield once ran for mayor of Toronto.

I suppose each of us could ask one another how we ended up in this neck of the woods; their stories would probably be as roundabout as mine.

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